Good morning everyone! Today we have the pleasure of featuring Imbue You Wedding‘s beautiful Indian-inspired folding invitation. I love the deep, autumn colors and the clever flap fold that holds more information!

This folded Indian print invitation resulted from a mix of our love for globally inspired prints and a desire to create an alternative to the pocketfold invitation.

My husband and I created our wedding invitation business after a friend asked us to brand her Persian wedding. We fell in love with researching global design in fabric, architecture and decorative items, and putting a modern spin on it.

I was really loving Indian archways and block print design, both of which inspired this print. They were modern and classic at the same time.

When I design I like to put myself in the guests’ shoes: What would I like to get? What would surprise me? What would tell me about the couple’s wedding style?

I love the look of layers and folds because they seem more personal, like “someone cared enough to make that and send it to me”. So I came up with this flap fold to tuck behind it a mini booklet for directions, events and accommodations. Everything stays together for the guests, held in place with the tag and ribbon.  Simple, yet personal.

Thank you Kemba! Visit Imbue You Wedding’s WeddingInviteLove profile, or head straight to their website for more.

Australian designer Rosalind Wong has a beautiful, restrained aesthetic — I love her graceful, simple, and classic invitations. Paired with warm colors and hand-stitching, out featured invitation today has big impact with great texture and feel.

The Aves design features two love birds perched on a branch together. As a designer, I have always wanted to design an invitation with birds as I love the silhouettes they create.

To give the invitation additional character, the branch element is created by sewing yellow thread.The thread ends are intentionally left uneven to give a rustic, hand-made feel. As each stationery item is sewn individually, every card is unique.

Bright Summer-inspired yellow, orange and red tones are incorporated within the invitation set. Textured, matte, white card and metallic red card are used to enhance the tactile nature of the printed invitation and makes the vibrant colours stand out.

Beautiful invitations, thanks for sharing them with us, Ros! Find out more about Rosalind Wong on WeddingInviteLove, or head straight to her website.

Did you hear about our giveaway? We’re giving away over $250 worth of paper goods and stationery this week — head over here to find out more!

 

Have you ever seen a bilingual invitation? I hadn’t (until now), and Julie from Cartoules Press did a great job handling two different languages, two different character sets, and twice as much information that is normally needed for a wedding invitation! The result is really beautiful:

Bilingual invitations are always my favorite jobs, mostly because it’s one of the reasons I started Cartoules. When my husband and I were to be married in Greece, we needed bilingual invitations in Greek and English, but I couldn’t find a printer or designer who matched our style. I decided to take some classes, and worked with my instructor to print our own invitations – and the rest is history. I was so in love with the letterpress process, and the tactile and old-world nature of the stationery that I started Cartoules with the intention of helping other brides who had the same needs as we did when planning our destination wedding.

Since then I’ve done a number of Greek/English bilingual wedding invitations (by the way, I’m totally open to doing other languages too and welcome the challenge), but Despina and Gioti’s are one of my favs. Despina wanted to incorporate a map into the invitation somehow. Even though this was not a destination wedding for her, it was for the groom and most of his family. She wanted to illustrate that even though they were half a world apart, they would come together after so many years to become one. We took this idea a step further by incorporating the red and blue, a postal stamp with their wedding date and location, and I had a lot of fun styling the suite with vintage stamps, envelopes and a Polaroid camera. Despina and Giotis loved how they turned out, and nothing pleases me more than a happy couple.

Thanks Julie! Go see more of Julie’s work on WeddingInviteLove, or go straight to the Cartoules Press website.

Really adorable invitation here today by Something Green Weddings. It’s so great to see cards that break out of the flower+swooshy-font invitation mold. Should remind all of us that weddings should be fun affairs and we shouldn’t take them too seriously!

I first started Something Green after making invitations for a few friends’ weddings. Their designs were more traditional, and I initially started making traditional designs when we first opened. However I wanted to try something new and unique.

I’m constantly doodling and always trying to make cutesy things so I decided to try a different style of wedding invitations. For some reason I have a habit of adding faces to drawings of food and inanimate objects. Because of this, I created the PB&J card design.  Two cute little toasts with peanut butter & jam spread on them, who spread the love by inviting people to their wedding.

It’s a cute twist on a classic pairing, because nothing goes better together than good ol’ peanut butter & jelly.

We have since come out with some more uniquely designed invitations and plan on adding more to the catalogue in the future. These post-card style cards are available as Invitations, RSVPs, Save the dates, and thank you cards.

Thank you for sharing that with us, Corinne! Go check out Something Green Weddings’ profile on WeddingInviteLove, or head directly to their website.

 

Time to take a break from the National Stationery Show coverage! This week’s featured invitation is by Artseed Weddings, a beautiful invitation set with letterpress details.

Hello! Eva-Lena Rehnmark here from Artseed Weddings. I am an illustrator/designer with a passion for beautiful, personal weddings. Wedding design is a creative and collaborative process to me. It is really a special experience to create an illustration for a couple that will come to represent their wedding to their family and friends. Coming from the professional world of book illustration I take pride in accepting direction when offered and offering direction when needed.

With this invitation suite the bridal couple (John and Holly) contacted me with the idea that they wanted a floral design on their invitation, maybe poppies or agapanthus. I sketched out both and they liked aspects of each flower.

I researched the flowers further and discovered that the agapanthus is the flower of love/ love letters : The genus name, “Agapanthus” is derived from two Greek words: “agape.” which means “love,” and “anthos,” which means “flower”. Taken together, the agapanthus is the flower of love. It is sometimes also known as “African lily” and “lily of the Nile,” tributes to its African origins. I suggested sticking with the agapanthus which had such a lovely symbolism. The bride agreed, adding “I agree with you on the agapanthus – I have loved them since I was a kid and they filled my mom’s garden – they remind me of fireworks which I love.  I had no idea of the etymology of the Greek, it seems like a sign.”
 

Knowing what flower we were going with was enormous but there was a lot left to decide, fonts, design, etc. With a fair amount of correspondence Holly and I got to know each other and the design went smoothly forward. I knew that the color choices were very important to John and Holly but they lived overseas on assignment in countries with shoddy postal service, so Holly asked me to send paper color samples to her sister here in the US. I love that the invitation design became a family project. Although Holly and John have a wedding planner, they are including their family in the details. Holly’s mom contacted me to ask for the agapanthus illustration file and is making favor bags with the flower. It will be fun to see how she uses the design.

The wedding stationary has come together beautifully. As an added bonus I will see the inside story on the wedding day as my talented pro photographer husband will be the wedding photographer!

 

Such a gorgeous set! Thank you Eva-Lena for letting us know about your invitations. :) To find out more about Artseed Weddings, check them out on WeddingInviteLove or at their website.

Today I’m excited because not only do I have a gorgeous invitation to feature, we’re also treated to great details about the printing process! Eleanor at e.m. papers is a really wonderful designer, and this is one of her top selling designs based on an invitation that’s very personal to her.

I wanted our California wedding last August to have the feel of a ‘mid-summer nights garden party’ which is what inspired my design. I really like the fact that a design that was so personal to me has also become an e.m.papers bestseller!

My dad is a letterpress printer, otherwise I would definitely not have had the budget to have invitations done letterpress – twice (we also had a ceremony in Munich, Germany where we live the preceding November, and my Dad printed those up too). I was not only lucky to get them done for free, but usually my dad refuses to do wedding invitations because according to him “People getting married are the worst clients in the world” (I don’t agree!). In spite of this, I spent a week sitting with my Dad in his shop, going over my Illustrator files, creating color separations and finally working with him (or more accurately observing him) while he printed all 3 pieces of the invitation suite. While this was going on, my (now) husband Armin documented it, taking pictures and video.


I designed a 3-color invitation suite including an invite, RSVP card and map. The design used white ink on chip board, which I thought would be really easy. When my dad took a look at it he sighed and muttered something about ‘designers always wanting something impossible…’ I thought he was being melodramatic. What I didn’t appreciate was how difficult it is to work with white ink, and white ink on dark chip board no less. We had to do a ‘double bump’ (run the white ink twice) to get it to read enough, and with letterpress getting everything to register (align) isn’t as precise as with offset or digital printing. To make matters worse chipboard is heavy and more uneven in weight than normal paper, so it was tricky to get it to feed consistently on the printer.


It was a long 2 days in the shop. Although Armin and I were both surprised by how much we enjoyed it, I remarked to my dad “Wow. This is a lot of work” without missing a beat he responded “Yeah! that’s what I wanted you to see!” At the end of it all, we had really beautiful invitations and a new found appreciation for what my Dad does (you think I would’ve paid more attention over the years.) The best thing about the invites was that they were permeated with the  love, laugh and happiness that Armin, my dad and I spent during those couple of days in his shop getting them printed.

So great, thank you Eleanor! I couldn’t include the whole set of the process, so I highly encourage everyone to check it out on Flickr and see more pictures of the process and Eleanor’s notes. Also go see e.m. paper’s other great invitation designs on WeddingInviteLove as well on empapers.com.

Thanks again for letting me feature your invitation design, Eleanor!

 


When I first saw Woodland Papercuts on Oh So Beautiful Paper, I was blown away — the invitations feature the beautiful textural qualities of lace combined with beautiful forest imagery. Today, Naomi has generously offered to go in depth about her papercuts, the process, and why these certain invitations are her personal favorite!

I’ve been thinking about making wedding stationery for years now, but I was reluctant to attempt such an undertaking until recently. Earlier this year I started making a papercut ketubot line in collaboration with Jennifer Raichman, and the more I worked on them the more I wanted to make matching invitation and reply cards.

It’s hard to pick one invitation that I’m proud of more than the others. The one I feel a special affinity to is the Deer Beloved invitation set. A few years ago, when I started developing my papercutting style, I also first took notice of deers. Since then they’ve been interwoven with my artistic development and they became a sort of visual mark of my illustrations, something I am inspired by and take care to include in some way in all of my work.

This invitation was designed and completed over the course of one night, while I was watching romantic movies to set the mood. The process is painstakingly detailed and maybe a bit repetitive, but I find it quite enjoyable. I like the attention to detail, and the reveal of the image from the paper. I like how the paper itself takes center stage, that the full impact of the papercut is both seen and felt. I think tactile illustration is very powerful.

Deer Beloved invitation features a forest scene of three majestic animals. Though the scene can be rustic, the lines of the illustration lend themselves to an elegant design. The invitation is matched by a stag reply card. The whole set, along with the complementing ketubah, are suited for a winter wedding.

Thank you so much, Naomi, for sharing with us! Visit her WeddingInviteLove profile, or check out her website for more beautiful examples of her paper cuts.

Have a great Tuesday, everyone!