Guide to Traditional Wedding Vows (1)

Photo Credit: Zibeti Photo Film

This wonderful guide to traditional wedding vows comes to us from our friends at Wedding Forward based in Toronto, ON!

It is difficult to put feelings into words, this is why some couples go with traditional wedding vows. Personal vows are the new trend and finding the right words can be easy for a select few. However, when in doubt, it is easy and safe to fall back on the customary vows used around the world. Style of wedding ceremony and couples’ wedding vows has experienced many modifications over the years. But, there are some standard vows for both bride or groom with writer’s block.

Read the full post after the cut!

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We were passed this lovely guest post by Joshua Withers, hope it helps you lovely brides and grooms struggling to write your vows! Take it away, Joshua:

I could never wear other people’s underwear. Whether it was borrowing from a friend or buying secondhand underwear from an op-shop, it’s just not my game. Underwear is private, personal, up-close, raw, real clothing. When I stood in front of Britt and our favourite humans to celebrate our marriage, I felt the same way about our vows.

I don’t wear other people’s underwear and I don’t exchange other people’s vows – it’s my marriage after all. When I come to that finite point of marriage, the point where I stop being a boyfriend and start being a husband, that’s a real moment that needs real words.

So I sat down and typed a thousand things that I wanted to say to Britt and eventually came to a place where I had my own personal vows.

If you’d like to create vows that wow, here are some starter tips:

  1. Write vows that are actually true. Don’t make a vow that doesn’t mean something to you.
  2. Write vows in your own language, in words that you would normally use.
  3. Make them as short or as long as they need to be. I love the old saying about the world’s most powerful prayer being “help”. Your vows can be one word if that word is true and real for you. But if it has to be an essay, let it be.
  4. Make your partner feel valued in your vows.
  5. Finally, your vows aren’t for the crowd, they’re for your partner. So if the crowd enjoys them, that’s lovely, but you’re not writing them for the crowd.

I’ve got a lot more to say about the matter, so grab a coffee and watch this Live Google Hangout I did on the subject :)

Thanks Joshua! For more information about Joshua Withers Wedding Celebrant, please visit his WeddingLovely Vendor Guide profile or head straight to his website.

Do you have any questions or comments for Josh? Add them to the comments below!